Discussion:
Seattle Rings
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Peter
2016-11-29 05:59:46 UTC
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Might anyone know what happened to the four year schedule of Seattle Rings,
since I understand that there will not be a Seattle Ring in 2017?
Mike Scott Rohan
2016-11-29 17:16:38 UTC
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Post by Peter
Might anyone know what happened to the four year schedule of Seattle Rings,
since I understand that there will not be a Seattle Ring in 2017?
As a regular Seattle supporter I get bulletins, but there's been no mention of it. I think the new director is waiting and hoping everyone will forget the old one before he follows it up -- probably with something Eurotrashy. All too possible.

Mike
Richard Partridge
2016-11-29 17:36:54 UTC
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On 11/29/16 12:16 PM, Mike Scott Rohan, at
Post by Mike Scott Rohan
Post by Peter
Might anyone know what happened to the four year schedule of Seattle Rings,
since I understand that there will not be a Seattle Ring in 2017?
As a regular Seattle supporter I get bulletins, but there's been no mention of
it. I think the new director is waiting and hoping everyone will forget the
old one before he follows it up -- probably with something Eurotrashy. All too
possible.
Mike
Young people always want something new. They want to have the latest. If
anything has been around for a few years, it gets old quickly, like stale
bread or mouldy cheese.

The day can't be too far off -- no more than one or two more decades -- when
the newest, most revolutionary thing will be a production of Wagner's Ring
that slavishly follows, insofar as possible, his own stage directions. That
will be the latest, and few people then alive will have seen anything like
it. Production managers will compete with each other to try to approximate,
as best they can, exactly what Richard Wagner called for. Critics will have
fun excoriating the productions that do not hew to the new line quickly
enough, and they will enjoy pointing out how these original, authentic
productions are susceptible to a wealth of interpretations, not just the one
that some bearded, beatnik stage manager wants to foist on us.

The challenge for us old-timers will be to live long enough to see it.

Dick Partridge
Mike Scott Rohan
2017-02-05 18:59:23 UTC
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Post by Richard Partridge
On 11/29/16 12:16 PM, Mike Scott Rohan, at
Post by Mike Scott Rohan
Post by Peter
Might anyone know what happened to the four year schedule of Seattle Rings,
since I understand that there will not be a Seattle Ring in 2017?
As a regular Seattle supporter I get bulletins, but there's been no mention of
it. I think the new director is waiting and hoping everyone will forget the
old one before he follows it up -- probably with something Eurotrashy. All too
possible.
Mike
Young people always want something new. They want to have the latest. If
anything has been around for a few years, it gets old quickly, like stale
bread or mouldy cheese.
The day can't be too far off -- no more than one or two more decades -- when
the newest, most revolutionary thing will be a production of Wagner's Ring
that slavishly follows, insofar as possible, his own stage directions. That
will be the latest, and few people then alive will have seen anything like
it. Production managers will compete with each other to try to approximate,
as best they can, exactly what Richard Wagner called for. Critics will have
fun excoriating the productions that do not hew to the new line quickly
enough, and they will enjoy pointing out how these original, authentic
productions are susceptible to a wealth of interpretations, not just the one
that some bearded, beatnik stage manager wants to foist on us.
The challenge for us old-timers will be to live long enough to see it.
Dick Partridge
Mmm. When all this really started, with a couple of European productions in the 1970s --including a Walkure with shots of ELvis Presley -- I was fairly young, and I didn't like it then either. Most of the producers doing this sort of thing now are fairly old, one or two even older than me. I fear it's more a state of mind, reinforced by self-promotion. I read of one producer the other day who was told by an Intendant "We want a suces de scandale!" So he got one, shrugged the producer. Faced with that sort of mentality, what hope is there of anything meaningful? We need another Wagner to restore dramatic sense to opera.

Mike
Mike Scott Rohan
2017-10-29 13:24:35 UTC
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Post by Richard Partridge
On 11/29/16 12:16 PM, Mike Scott Rohan, at
Post by Mike Scott Rohan
Post by Peter
Might anyone know what happened to the four year schedule of Seattle Rings,
since I understand that there will not be a Seattle Ring in 2017?
As a regular Seattle supporter I get bulletins, but there's been no mention of
it. I think the new director is waiting and hoping everyone will forget the
old one before he follows it up -- probably with something Eurotrashy. All too
possible.
Mike
Young people always want something new. They want to have the latest. If
anything has been around for a few years, it gets old quickly, like stale
bread or mouldy cheese.
The day can't be too far off -- no more than one or two more decades -- when
the newest, most revolutionary thing will be a production of Wagner's Ring
that slavishly follows, insofar as possible, his own stage directions. That
will be the latest, and few people then alive will have seen anything like
it. Production managers will compete with each other to try to approximate,
as best they can, exactly what Richard Wagner called for. Critics will have
fun excoriating the productions that do not hew to the new line quickly
enough, and they will enjoy pointing out how these original, authentic
productions are susceptible to a wealth of interpretations, not just the one
that some bearded, beatnik stage manager wants to foist on us.
The challenge for us old-timers will be to live long enough to see it.
Dick Partridge
Incidentally, Richard, I don't know if you noticed the announcement (I think it popped up here a while back) that conductor Kent Nagano is working on a Ring which is to explore authentic musical and stage production -- something like that, anyhow, What it amounts to, we'll have to see; it could be just another fudge, like this year's so-called "revival" of Karajan's Salzburg production. But it may be a step in the right direction, at least...

Cheers,

Mike

Edward A. Cowan
2017-10-29 03:11:29 UTC
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Post by Richard Partridge
The day can't be too far off -- no more than one or two more decades -- when
the newest, most revolutionary thing will be a production of Wagner's Ring
that slavishly follows, insofar as possible, his own stage directions. That
will be the latest, and few people then alive will have seen anything like
it. Production managers will compete with each other to try to approximate,
as best they can, exactly what Richard Wagner called for. Critics will have
fun excoriating the productions that do not hew to the new line quickly
enough, and they will enjoy pointing out how these original, authentic
productions are susceptible to a wealth of interpretations, not just the one
that some bearded, beatnik stage manager wants to foist on us. <<

I attended the 1980 _Ring_ cycle in Seattle. The productions were solidly traditional (the way I like it), and the singing was less than standard Wagnerian vocalism, but I enjoyed the performances. This was the first time I had attended an integral four-in-one sequence of the music dramas. Dallas offered a Ring cycle not long thereafter, but the sequence was one-per-season and not immediately sequential in one season. --E.A.C.
Mike Scott Rohan
2017-10-29 13:18:37 UTC
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Post by Richard Partridge
Post by Richard Partridge
The day can't be too far off -- no more than one or two more decades -- when
the newest, most revolutionary thing will be a production of Wagner's Ring
that slavishly follows, insofar as possible, his own stage directions. That
will be the latest, and few people then alive will have seen anything like
it. Production managers will compete with each other to try to approximate,
as best they can, exactly what Richard Wagner called for. Critics will have
fun excoriating the productions that do not hew to the new line quickly
enough, and they will enjoy pointing out how these original, authentic
productions are susceptible to a wealth of interpretations, not just the one
that some bearded, beatnik stage manager wants to foist on us. <<
I attended the 1980 _Ring_ cycle in Seattle. The productions were solidly traditional (the way I like it), and the singing was less than standard Wagnerian vocalism, but I enjoyed the performances. This was the first time I had attended an integral four-in-one sequence of the music dramas. Dallas offered a Ring cycle not long thereafter, but the sequence was one-per-season and not immediately sequential in one season. --E.A.C.
Yes, several of us here were at the earliest Seattle production, myself a year or two after you --when, incidentally, the singing was not at all bad, with a notable Wotan in Anthony Raffell. And before that they'd had the benefit of Rita Hunter and Alberto Remedios. That staging could be a touch too traditional, admittedly, with the Rhinemaidens galumphing about afoot in rather wrinkly green leotards, but much more bearable than their usual Eurotrash equivalents. And it had the benefit of an authentic steam curtain a la Bayreuth premiere, courtesy of the city steam system, which also fuelled a huge if hilarious Fafner (legs revolving independently on little wheels) -- and as Bayreuth attendees claimed, it did make the theatre smell like a laundry! I also liked the community feeling of the whole thing, with immense local support. However, I don't know if you saw the last production -- if not there are many examples on Youtube -- which I went back for every year; for me that was immensely preferable, with few of the allowances the earlier one needed.

Cheers,

Mike

Mike
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