Discussion:
"Studying Performance Practice Through Sound Recordings: Richard Wagner" (recent article)
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g***@gmail.com
2018-02-16 00:53:37 UTC
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Mike Scott Rohan
2018-02-16 16:11:02 UTC
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https://guides.library.yale.edu/c.php?g=525668&p=4810780
It's interesting that this resource seems to concentrate wholly on performances of "bleeding chunks" in the concert hall or studio -- surely an inadequate measure of performance in Wagner, of all composers. Can one conduct a really good excerpt with little or no experience of the full work? It's possible; Neeme Jarvi does a good job in his Chandos Ring excerpts, but on the other hand his Tristan and some others in the same series are rather wallowy and turgid.
Mike Scott Rohan
2018-02-16 16:22:54 UTC
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https://guides.library.yale.edu/c.php?g=525668&p=4810780
It's interesting that this resource seems to concentrate wholly on performances of "bleeding chunks" in the concert hall or studio -- surely an inadequate measure of performance in Wagner, of all composers. Can one conduct a really good excerpt with little or no experience of the full work? It's possible; Neeme Jarvi does a good job in his Chandos Ring excerpts, but on the other hand his Tristan and some others in the same series are rather wallowy and turgid.
(Sorry -- last line of above went missing!)
More full-length experience would tend to avoid such pitfalls. For that reason among many others it would surely be better to start conducting students with full versions.

Of course most of these conductors have considerable full-opera experience, except, as far as I know, Stokowski -- never a good model for students, I'd have thought, despite his own peculiar talent. But does that always show up in excerpts? As Culshaw points out, Knappertsbusch in recording was always a very different animal from K live, and that's true of many.


Cheers,

Mike

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