Discussion:
Alberto Remedios RIP
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Nicholas G
2016-06-15 13:57:17 UTC
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http://slippedisc.com/2016/06/sad-news-death-of-a-heroic-british-tenor/

http://slippedisc.com/2016/06/how-a-wagner-hero-handled-londons-opera-snobs/
Mike Scott Rohan
2016-06-16 19:39:00 UTC
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Post by Nicholas G
http://slippedisc.com/2016/06/sad-news-death-of-a-heroic-british-tenor/
http://slippedisc.com/2016/06/how-a-wagner-hero-handled-londons-opera-snobs/
That is sad, although 81's a respectable enough age. Lebrecht's reports make him a dock worker, which sounds like a longshoreman. I'd always understood he was a riveter and welder at the great Cammell Laird yards, which was a much more skilled job. Definitely a down-to-earth character, though, with a very Liverpudlian ebullience offstage -- very Siegfried-like, in fact.

Cheers,

Mike
m***@bertcoules.co.uk
2016-06-17 20:06:01 UTC
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I woke to this news on Radio 3 the other morning: a sad way to start the day. I've written before here on my admiration for him, in Wagner particularly: there are some artists with whom it's possible to develop a bond that feels almost personal, even if you've never met them: Remedios was like that for me. He embodied "my" Siegfried as no other performer had before or has since: under Goodall, the character became more lyrical, more sympathetic, more believable, more real, than I'd ever previously known him to be. I was a student in London at the time of the first night of the Blatchley/Byam Shaw/Koltai/Ornbo production; the next day I bought a ticket for every other performance in the run: I simply couldn't stand the thought of them doing it and my not being there to watch. And to listen, of course: "the singer with a smile in his voice" Remedios was called once, but there was steel there too when it was needed, and astonishing stamina.

I saw him in the main Ring tenor roles (and as Froh at Covent Garden, a curious prelude to his Siegfried there a year later) as well as Tristan, Lohengrin, Walther and Erik. And also as Don José, in various Verdi roles (including a short and not entirely successful one-off run as Otello for WNO), in Tippett and in Berlioz: a memorable last-minute stand-in for an absent Jon Vickers in The Trojans. And I have fond memories of a Queen Elizabeth Hall lieder recital when for one song he reached into a pocket and produced a postcard covered in closely-packed writing. "Don't want to get the words wrong," he explained, completely unapologetically.

That sort of naturalness and ease came across on stage, too, and sometimes perhaps a little too much: he needed a firm directorial hand to discipline him into giving his best dramatically. But when that happened, when everything came together, my word there really was no-one like him. I count myself lucky to have been there during his golden days in a company enjoying theirs. Yes, that news was a sad way to start a day.
Nicholas G
2016-06-17 21:19:14 UTC
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I wonder if there is any chance of someone (Chandos?) releasing the BBC recording of one of the ENO Tristans with Goodall conducting?
Mike Scott Rohan
2016-06-21 01:10:02 UTC
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He embodied "my" Siegfried as no other performer had before or has since: >under Goodall, the character became more lyrical, more sympathetic, more >believable, more real, than I'd ever previously known him to be.
Certainly he was a "complete" Siegfried, in a way few others ever were; some bettered him in this aspect or that, vocal power or stage presence, but they didn't add up as well as he did. He didn't "get in the way" of the role; he inhabited it.
I was a student in London at the time of the first night of the >Blatchley/Byam Shaw/Koltai/Ornbo production; the next day I bought a ticket >for every other performance in the run: I simply couldn't stand the thought of >them doing it
And I was there too, though I had to come in from Oxford -- with Deb and our best mutual friend (whose girlfriend didn't like Wagner) reeling Siegfried-drunk down Oxford Street scattering all before us. We didn't quite equal Deb's earlier feat while studying in Vienna -- after Gotterdammerung (in standing place!) she was so dazed she got on the tram the wrong way right around the Ringstrasse and didn't realise it till she got off! -- but nearly as daft. We hadn't been sure Remedios could hack it, but we were totally bowled over.

Cheers,

Mike
m***@bertcoules.co.uk
2016-06-18 07:43:51 UTC
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With Linda Esther Grey, Margaret Curphey and Norman Bailey, and in a splendid English version by Andrew Porter: that would be a welcome release indeed, especially if it could be done legitimately. I'd settle for an unauthorised version if it was in decent sound, though nothing seems to be around: even the comprehensive Opera Depot listings don't include it.
Mike Scott Rohan
2016-06-23 01:54:31 UTC
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Post by m***@bertcoules.co.uk
With Linda Esther Grey, Margaret Curphey and Norman Bailey, and in a splendid English version by Andrew Porter: that would be a welcome release indeed, especially if it could be done legitimately. I'd settle for an unauthorised version if it was in decent sound, though nothing seems to be around: even the comprehensive Opera Depot listings don't include it.
Had a look around when I could over the last few days, and finally came up with this...



Haven't had a chance to hear more than a smidgen myself yet -- appears the final bars are missing....

Cheers,

Mike
Bert Coules
2016-06-23 15:11:34 UTC
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Mike, thanks for that. I haven't checked through the whole thing, but the
close of act three is certainly there, followed by applause.

There's a wonderful description of Remedios in one of the comments:
"Offstage he was like Harry Secombe, only dafter".

Bert

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